Best Sharpening Stones to keep your knives sharp

Knife sharpeners are required for knife maintenance because a sharp knife is vital for slicing and dicing ingredients. Electric and manual knife sharpeners are different, but whetstones are the best when it comes to maintaining a sharp blade.

When your blade begins to get dull, you need a whetstone with coarse and fine grits: this will allow for ultimate control and refinement. For the best knife care, you can rely on whetstones for sharpening or honing; when you find one that matches your needs, it’s a solid investment.

When it comes to whetstone grits, choose from the finest surfaces for your knives. From standard to diamond, these are the best sharpening stones on the market.

It is mostly a matter of personal preference which type of sharpening stone you will use. Oil stones are loved by some, but some may rather choose diamond stones because they are fast and easy to maintain. In most cases, people combine two or more types of sharpening stones.

4.5/5

One of the best ways to sharpen knives is with water stones. This option from Sharp Pebble is a budget-friendly stone that has a two-sided grit. The finer 1,000/6,000 grit is perfect for repairing dull blades and on the other side there’s a 6,000 grit for honing edges to a sharp point. It also comes with a nonslip bamboo base so you can use it anywhere even in wet environments.. This option from Sharp Pebble is a budget-friendly stone that has a two-sided grit. The finer 1,000/6,000 grit is perfect for repairing dull blades and on the other side there’s a 6,000 grit for honing edges to a sharp point. It also comes with a nonslip bamboo base so you can use it anywhere even in wet environments.

The Sharp Pebble is a high-quality water stone. It can be used on all sorts of knives, even garden shears. The included angle guide makes it easier to find the right angle for sharpening different types of knives. This is a water stone that requires soaking in water for at least 10 to 15 minutes before you can use it.

Oil stones are more durable than their softer water stone counterparts. The Norton double-sided oil stone is made from aluminum oxide which is known as tough and wear-resistant. It has a 100/320 split, which is more for repairing and sharpening so you may want to add a high-grit stone for polishing and refining.

The Norton Combination Oilstone requires no presoaking and comes prefilled with oil to keep it lubricated. It promises a long life, but can be difficult to clean. It is recommended that you clean this with kerosene and a stiff brush and let it dry completely before soaking it in mineral oil.

The Duo Sharp is a double-sided (coarse/fine) sharpener with a precision flat surface made from monocrystalline diamond. This super hard and abrasive material quickly restores a dull edge on the coarse side and creates razor-sharp edges on the fine side. The stone can be used dry or wet with water as the lubricant. A sharpening stone is most effective when it’s flat which is why Duo Sharp stays flat throughout its lifetime.

This Japanese-styled whetstone will turn your knives into razor sharp works of art. King is a trusted manufacturer of sharpening stones and this dual sided whetstone has a 1,000 grit side for polishing and a 6,000 grit side for honing.

The angle guide allows you to sharpen knives with precision. This model also has a sturdy base to provide stability during processing. The wide range of grit sizes allows you to sharpen not just kitchen knives, but also pocket knives, ax blades, and gardening tools. Be sure to soak this ceramic water stone before use.

What to Look for in Sharpening Stones

Grit

Grit is what can make or break a blade in the sharpening process. A blunt or damaged blade will need a coarse grit that’s below 1000 to shape and sharpen. If a knife isn’t completely dull, then it’ll need medium grit that’s between 1000 and 4000. The final step is using fine grit, which can be anything above 4000.
 

Type

  • Oil Stones – The oil stone is a hard, man-made stone that is used for sharpening knives and other tools. To sharpen with an oil stone, the surface of the stone must be lubricated with oil first.
  • Arkansas Stones – Arkansas stones can be used as sharpening stones or as bathstones. They are also called Novaculite, and the word comes from Latin, meaning “razor stone”. Novaculite is quarried in Arkansas and has been since the early 1800s. Arkansas stones are cut into rectangular shapes to be used for sharpening knives.
  • Water Stones – One of the types of stones a person might use to sharpen their knives is a water stone. These stones need to be wet before they can work. Natural waterstones are quarried in Belgium and Japan, and have been used for hundreds of years.
  • Diamond Sharpening Stones – Diamond sharpening stones are the fastest growing type of sharpening stone, and they’re quickly becoming the preferred choice for many chefs and professionals. Diamond stones are made of man-made diamonds that have been electroplated onto metal plates. The diamond particles are embedded in nickel plating to make them as durable as possible. They’re extremely fast when it comes to sharpening knives, making them a good option for those who cook often.